Student Conduct, Disciplinary and Reporting Misconduct

Part P – Student Conduct and Disciplinary Regulations 2021-22 explains the process for the formal reporting and investigation of alleged student misconduct, as well as the potential penalties that may be applied when allegations against a student are found to be proven. They also set out the means for reported students to appeal against the decisions made about them.

Students should ensure that they read the regulations in order that they are fully informed of the process.

What is Misconduct?

The University’s definition of misconduct involves actions which fall into one (or more) of the categories below:

  • actions that cause actual or potential distress or harm to others (regardless of intention);
  • actions that disrupt the normal operations of the University and/or safe use of the University including bringing the University into disrepute;
  • actions that cause actual or potential damage to property;
  • actions that interfere with the work/study of others or impact on the University’s normal operations;
  • failure to disclose any criminal investigation or conviction, court or legal order, in process or obtained whilst as a student, or if prior to enrolment is found would impair a student’s ability to study on the basis of safeguarding;
  • conduct which constitutes a criminal offence including conviction for an offence which fulfils the criteria of P.2.8 of the regulations.

Reporting Misconduct as a Student

  • Students can speak to Student Support for guidance about the reporting process.
  • Student Wellbeing can offer personal support which students might feel beneficial following issues meaning they wish to make a report about alleged student misconduct.
  • Student Wellbeing colleagues can signpost students to useful resources, relevant external services and provide support to students to make reports to the Police, when this is appropriate.

Contact details for Student Support and Student Wellbeing can be found here.

To formally report alleged student misconduct to the University, then reports must be made on a prescribed form which is available from the Secretariat.

Involving the Police can be invaluable for the University when it undertakes its own investigation, but we understand this can be a daunting and stressful experience for students. it is important that students know that the Police can obtain evidence which the University does not have the powers to but the University has an Information Sharing Agreement in place with the Police which means it can access and rely on Police findings for when it needs to investigate and reach conclusions about the reports it receives.

Reporting Misconduct (or signposting/advising students) as a member of Staff

  • Staff can speak with their line management and Human Resources for support which they might feel beneficial following issues meaning they wish to make a report about alleged student misconduct.
  • Students must always be signposted to the Student Support Centre and Student Wellbeing as outlined above, to ensure they get the correct advice and support.
  • No action should be taken by either academic or professional services departments against students without liaising with the Secretariat in the first instance; Secretariat can provide advice on practical precautionary measures which are appropriate to implement, pending a finding as under the regulations.
  • Academic and professional services departments should not impart their views on expected outcomes to students/staff/third parties wanting to make reports; this can distort expectations about what the University can achieve and this is unfair to individuals.

To formally report alleged student misconduct to the University, then reports must be made on a prescribed form which is available from the Secretariat.

How can I avoid committing Misconduct?

The Regulations provide examples of the sorts of actions and behaviours that are considered to be student misconduct.

Students should always be conscious that other people may perceive their actions differently – misconduct is still misconduct regardless of ‘intent’; the University often investigates issues thought by students to just be ‘banter’ or ‘pranks’.